10 Most Popular Astronotes Stories of 2014

In 2014 Armagh Planetarium’s website (including Astronotes) received well over 1 million page views from all over the world. What were all these people coming to see? Here are the 10 most viewed Astronotes articles of 2014.

Apollo 17 lunar module pilot Harrison Schmitt uses an adjustable sampling scoop to retrieve lunar samples during the second Apollo 17 moon walk. His spacesuit is covered with a layer of the lunar dust. (Image Credit: NASA/Eugene Cernan)

More than 40 years on visitors are still looking for information on the Moon missions. Here Apollo 17 astronaut Harrison Schmitt uses an adjustable sampling scoop to retrieve lunar samples during the second Apollo 17 moon walk. His spacesuit is covered with a layer of lunar dust.
(Image Credit:
NASA/Eugene Cernan)

 

 

1. The Truth About the Black Knight Satellite Mystery

2. 8 Myths About Neil Armstrong’s Flight to the Moon

3. How Far Away is the Farthest Star?

4. The Truth About Zeta Reticuli

5. The 10 Best Space and Astronomy Sites on the Internet

6. Top 10 Astronomy and Space Gifts for Christmas 2013

7. The Dangers of Space Travel

8. Apollo 18: the truth about the lost Moon missions

9. 11 Strange Facts You Didn’t Know About the First Moon Landing

10. No, NASA has not verified an impossible space drive!

What lessons can we learn from this list? These articles are all well-written and factual, but what makes these and many of our other articles popular is their uniqueness. They contain information that either cannot be found elsewhere or is not conveniently summarised across the internet.

As for what attracts our readers, there are several “hot-button” topics. More than 40 years on NASA’s Moon missions, especially Apollo 11,  still continue to fascinate. Many of our web visitors come under the impression that there are unanswered questions in the history of the US space programme or are intrigued by the possibilities of alien visitations. I hope our articles help correct some of the myths about these topics.

I am very happy to see that in its present blog format Astronotes is promoting space and astronomy education to a larger and wider audience than ever before.

If you have any suggestions for astronomy and space-related topics for future Astronotes articles, why not leave them in the comments section?

(Article by Colin Johnston, Science Education Director)