Our Galaxy Archive

  • How is it March already? 2019 has just flown in! Although we have had a mild winter, we can start to wave goodbye to the dark evenings and say hello to Spring as the date that I have been longing for ever since the evenings got shorter – the Spring Equinox on the 20th March fast approaches.

    The March Night Sky 2019

    How is it March already? 2019 has just flown in! Although we have had a mild winter, we can start to wave goodbye to the dark evenings and say hello to Spring as the date that I have been longing for ever since the evenings got shorter – the Spring Equinox on the 20th March fast approaches.

    Continue Reading...

  • Article by: Gavin Ramsay Unlike our Sun, around half of all stars have another stellar companion. The closest stars to the Sun are two bright southern stars, alpha Centauri A […]

    Binary Stars – The Basics

    Article by: Gavin Ramsay Unlike our Sun, around half of all stars have another stellar companion. The closest stars to the Sun are two bright southern stars, alpha Centauri A […]

    Continue Reading...

  • Before addressing Black Hole sizes, we should first go back to see what astronomers mean when they use the term "Black Hole". This may be easiest to understand when considering the end products of stars.

    How Big is the biggest Black Hole we know of?

    Before addressing Black Hole sizes, we should first go back to see what astronomers mean when they use the term "Black Hole". This may be easiest to understand when considering the end products of stars.

    Continue Reading...

  • In a nutshell, comets are small bodies of ice and dust in orbit around the Sun. When they pass near the sun, they start to vaporize creating long tails of dust and gas. Even this small amount of information makes us ask so many questions about these members of our solar system.

    Comets 101 – What you need to know!

    In a nutshell, comets are small bodies of ice and dust in orbit around the Sun. When they pass near the sun, they start to vaporize creating long tails of dust and gas. Even this small amount of information makes us ask so many questions about these members of our solar system.

    Continue Reading...

  • Article written by: Heather Alexander, Education officer At the Armagh Observatory and Planetarium we have been having a look at all the things that are going to happen throughout the […]

    10 things you need to know about Space – 2019

    Article written by: Heather Alexander, Education officer At the Armagh Observatory and Planetarium we have been having a look at all the things that are going to happen throughout the […]

    Continue Reading...

  • Our view of the cosmos is biased by the vista that is apparent to our eyes.  This is what the view in what we call the optically visible portion of the spectrum. To the unaided eye it is a view of a universe full of stars, together with five planets, one Moon and of course the Sun. When augmented with a telescope, our eyes can then see a universe full of galaxies – giant cities of stars.

    What is Radio Astronomy?

    Our view of the cosmos is biased by the vista that is apparent to our eyes.  This is what the view in what we call the optically visible portion of the spectrum. To the unaided eye it is a view of a universe full of stars, together with five planets, one Moon and of course the Sun. When augmented with a telescope, our eyes can then see a universe full of galaxies – giant cities of stars.

    Continue Reading...

  • Here we are, on the count down to Christmas, and we're having a look at all the Astronotes that have been written for our blog this year. We've had input not just from the Education Team this year, but also the Academic Staff of the Armagh Observatory and Planetarium.

    Top Astronotes of 2018

    Here we are, on the count down to Christmas, and we're having a look at all the Astronotes that have been written for our blog this year. We've had input not just from the Education Team this year, but also the Academic Staff of the Armagh Observatory and Planetarium.

    Continue Reading...

  • The long cold dark nights have well and truly settled in, and now that it’s December it’s officially acceptable to say the C word. Christmas, Christmas is coming! And so is Santa Claus! Decorations are going up, there’s mad panic to buy Christmas presents and families are organising who’s having dinner and where. Ahh I love this time of year.

    What’s in the Sky this December?

    The long cold dark nights have well and truly settled in, and now that it’s December it’s officially acceptable to say the C word. Christmas, Christmas is coming! And so is Santa Claus! Decorations are going up, there’s mad panic to buy Christmas presents and families are organising who’s having dinner and where. Ahh I love this time of year.

    Continue Reading...

  • With Space Exploration comes theories and conspiracies. In our latest blog we debunk some of the more infamous ones.

    5 Theories and Conspiracies Debunked

    With Space Exploration comes theories and conspiracies. In our latest blog we debunk some of the more infamous ones.

    Continue Reading...

  • NASA has announced the retirement of the Kepler spacecraft. After launch in March 2009, it began a continuous observation of a 115 square degree field of view (the diameter of the moon is 1/2 a degree) between the constellations Cygnus and Lyra.

    On the retirement of Kepler

    NASA has announced the retirement of the Kepler spacecraft. After launch in March 2009, it began a continuous observation of a 115 square degree field of view (the diameter of the moon is 1/2 a degree) between the constellations Cygnus and Lyra.

    Continue Reading...