Our Place in the Universe Course Returns in Autumn 2014

We are delighted to announce our very popular course Our Place in the Universe will be returning this October. This short and very informal course is aimed at complete beginners who want to know more about the wonders of the cosmos. No prior knowledge or equipment is required.

 

The Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO’s La Silla Observatory in Chile has captured the best image so far of the star cluster NGC 3572, a gathering of young stars, and its spectacular surroundings. This new image shows how the clouds of gas and dust around the cluster have been sculpted into whimsical bubbles, arcs and the odd features known as elephant trunks by the stellar winds flowing from the bright stars. The brightest of these cluster stars are heavier than the Sun and will end their short lives as supernova explosions. Credit: ESO/G. Beccari

This image  of the star cluster NGC 3572 shows how the clouds of gas and dust around the cluster have been sculpted into whimsical bubbles, arcs and the odd features known as elephant trunks by the stellar winds flowing from the bright stars. The brightest of these cluster stars are heavier than the Sun and will end their short lives as supernova explosions. (Image credit:
ESO/G. Beccari)

 

Over ten weeks, the course takes a season by season look at the stars in their constellations and the mythology surrounding them, before examining the other worlds in our Solar System, we then move out to the stars and nebulae before exploring the galaxies and expanding Universe. We finish by discussing the ever-fascinating question of whether there is life beyond our planet. The course is presented in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere with extensive use of beautiful and up to date imagery from the world’s greatest observatories or exciting space missions. If you want to discover the amazing objects we can all see at night and learn just how our planet fits into the wider Universe, this is the course for you.

I have been successfully presenting this course since 2006 and the contents are continually revised to match the latest knowledge. Happily, the feedback from students is overwhelmingly positive and it is gratifying to feel that I am meeting a public demand to find more about what lies beyond our little planet.

Frequently Asked Questions

When is the Course held?

 The course will be held on Wednesdays (11am-1pm) starting on 1 October 2014 (Course Code OLE0838 ) at QUB School of Education. It will run weekly and finish on 3 December 2014.

 

Where is the course held?
It will be held in 18 College Green (entrance via 20 College Green)

 

How do I get on it?

Enrolment for this course must be made through QUB School of Education Open Learning (not through the Planetarium).  The course is listed in the Science section of the prospectus. It is on page 134. Alternately you can enrol online.

How much does it cost?

The ten week course costs £64 (Concession £40)

I don’t have a telescope, can I still come to the course?

Yes, it is aimed at beginners  and no telescope (or other equipment is required). By the end of the course you might be planning on buying your first telescope!

 

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